Wednesday, 29 July 2009

I'm feeling brain dead

So in lieu of writing summink myself, here's a nice bit from the preface to a short primer (so really the most basic, simpleton's précised version of his ideas possible!) on Pierre Bourdieu that I bought because of this post.
[L]inguistic and cultural production, despite what they might claim to be, are not concerned with truth or reason (or the sublime, or beauty) . What is at stake is primarily belief, the consecration of utterances as legitimate and/or true. The criterian of argumentation of proof that are invoked during this process are arbitrary - defined within and by the field in question - and only apparently disinterested. The legitimation of utterances is a product of the power, authority and reputation of their author(s) in the field in question. This epistemic power is both means and end in the competitive struggles - analogised by Bourdieu as games - which characterise any field, and is constructed using a range of capitals: economic, cultural, linguistic, symbolic and social. These varied forms of capital are similarly means and ends in strategies that carry forward the pursuit of distinction within the field.

I'm only about a third of the way through this, but it clearly looks like it will get into the issue that I briefly blogged very briefly about (a bit more here) last year - the legitimation of ideas.

4 comments:

Peter Shield said...

Why does it take post-modernists a book to say what could be said in a sentence after a pint of two of brain stimulating beverage?

Harry Barnes said...

Labour : What Is To Be Done? See -
http://dronfieldblather.blogspot.com/2009/07/labour-what-is-to-be-done.html

d_netzz said...

Have you come across Boltanski and Chiapello's "The New Spirit of Capitalism" yet? http://www.versobooks.com/books/ab/b-titles/boltanski_chiapello_new.shtml
You should find lots on the legitimation of ideas in there. Also, "On Justification" by Boltanski and Thevenot could help:
http://press.princeton.edu/titles/8182.html

Tom Powdrill said...

Oooh some great book tips there - thanks!